Tag Archives: IMEC

50 kbits/s Organic Transponder Circuit

Imec and TNO showcased the first organic transponder circuit with a bit rate of 50 kbits/s. The bit rate approaches the requirements for the Electronic Product Coding (EPC) standards. The Electronic Product Code has been developed for wireless identification in high-volume logistics applications like retail. It is widely used already today e.g. on pallet level logistics. The next step is to use EPC tags on package level and on a longer term target on individual items (“item-level tagging”). Organic electronic technology is a candidate for high-volume and low-cost manufacturing of simple electronic circuits.

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Imec Double Heterostructure FET for GaN-on-Si Power Switching Devices

Imec announced an innovative, simple, and robust GaN-on-Si double heterostructure FET (field effect transistor) architecture for GaN-on-Si power switching devices. The architecture meets the normally off requirements of power switching circuits and is characterized by low leakage and high breakdown voltage, both essential parameters to reduce the power loss of high-power switching applications.

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IMEC Microchip with Microscopic Nail Structures

IMEC announced a microchip with microscopic nail structures that enable close communication between the electronics and biological cells. The new chip is a mass-producible, easy-to-use tool in electrophysiology research (such as fundamental research on the functioning and dysfunctioning of the brain). Each micronail structure serves as a close contact-point for one cell, and contains an electrode that can very accurately record and trigger in real-time the electrical activity of an individual electrogenic cell in a network.

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Terepac and IMEC Team on Flexible Electronics Packaging

Terepac teamed with IMEC to develop packaging technologies for flexible electronics. The initial driver for the synergistic shared research relationship is a next generation wireless ECG system, developed in the Human++ Program at Holst Centre, Eindhoven. The patented photochemical printing process, thinned silicon dies, and passive components can be placed on flexible substrates at speeds of more than one chip per second and with accuracies down to a few microns.

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